Topaz Glow

My quick overview of Topaz Glow…

Glowing Shark
A Hammerhead Shark Image post processed using Glow

A hammerhead shark swims beneath the sea in this impressionist work featuring fluid glowing lines with an almost neon quality to them.

This was actually made from an older image of mine that was a realistic image of a hammerhead shark, created using digital 3D rendering techniques. I’ve altered it though using a tool called Glow From Topaz labs. It’s a really cool computer program that gives your images a wild expressionist look ranging from a style reminiscent of Vincent Van Gogh to modernist neon impressionism.

 
Hammerhead
The Image before being processed in Glow

I’d seen a lot of photographers making sales with their photos that had been run through Topaz Glow. They looked awesome and I knew I wanted to give the application a try with some of my render art. It required me to update the drivers on my graphics card, but once I did that, it was easy to install and very easy to use.

I found that it doesn’t always make an image better, but for some it really had some great results. This particular image, I thought, turned out very well.

Glow used to be a standalone application, but now you get it as a plugin for Topaz’s flagship application Topaz Studio.  Studio is free and allows you to integrate most of their products.  Glow will set you back around 70 bucks, but it’s can pay for itself in just one print sale.

If you’d like to check out Topaz Glow, and I recommend that you do, click on the button.

Get Glow

By the way, that link is an affiliate link. If you click on it and should happen to buy glow within 30 days, I will get a small commission on the sale. It does not raise the price for you. For those of you who do buy, THANK YOU!

I’ve also done a video review of glow.  This was the older version prior to being a plug in for Topaz Studio, but the latest version is quite similar in what is can do. 

 

Regards,
Daniel

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What is Photoshop?

Photoshop, a  product description

Photoshop is the single most powerful and most used computer application in the world for art and photography.  Most people who have spent any time doing digital art or photography have used it.  However, as you may be new to digital art, I’m going to introduce it as if you’ve never heard of it.
 
Sepia Image
A image with a sepia tone filter applied using Photoshop
Photoshop is a digital image manipulation program, that is, it’s an image editor.  You can do all sorts of things to an image as a whole with it, such as adjusting brightness, contrast, etc.; moreover, you can use it to apply various filters to image, for instance, giving an image a sepia tone.   You can also edit parts of the image, such as painting on it with virtual brushes.  In fact, you can create an entire digital painting with it. And, it works particularly well with tablets and styluses (I personally use it with a Wacom Bamboo).
 
Until I got into 3D rendering, Photoshop was all I needed for doing digital art.  For several years, I needed nothing else.  There is so much that you can do with Photoshop. There are so many books on how to use it that they could fill a library, classes you can take, and thousands upon thousands of Youtube videos on how to use it.

How to get it 

Photoshop
Photoshop with one of my images loaded.

For a long time, Photoshop was a rather expensive application that you had to buy at a place like Best Buy off the shelf.  Later on, you could buy it online and download it, but even then, it cost hundreds of dollars.  Now however, Adobe (the company that produces Photoshop) has made it available through a subscription model.  That makes it way more comfortable to try out.  As I write this, you can get a monthly subscription as low as 10 bucks a month.  

 
It’s something you might want to check out…
 

Watch Me Get Photoshop

I recorded myself actually getting the latest version of Photoshop.  So if you want a video walk through of how to get it, here you go:

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